Central Intelligence Agency chief: Not surprising if North Korea tests missile again

Postado Agosto 13, 2017

CIA Director Mike Pompeo on Sunday defended President Trump's tough rhetoric toward North Korea and praised the administration for "uniting the world" in trying to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula while making clear there is no intelligence that shows a nuclear war is "imminent".

Pompeo also defended President Donald Trump's warning that North Korea, which has been in conflict with the United States since the start of the Korean War in 1950, would face "fire and fury" if it issued any more threats to the USA, comments that were widely criticized last week as overheated and interpreted by some as threatening a preemptive nuclear attack. "Previous administrations haven't taken this on", Pompeo said.

"There's nothing imminent today", Mr. Pompeo said.

Trump wrote on Twitter on Friday that U.S. He said the USA has a "pretty good idea" of North Korea's intentions, but Pompeo declined to provide specifics.

U.S. President Donald Trump has made clear how the U.S. will respond to North Korea's provocations, and hopefully, the regime will understand, Pompeo added.

The call came after Trump made fresh threats against North Korea on Friday, declaring the USA military "locked and loaded" and warning Kim that he "will regret it fast" if he takes any action against US territories or allies.

The top US military officer, Marine Corps Gen. Joseph Dunford, is traveling in Asia and expected to meet with leaders in South Korea, Japan and China.

White House officials have insisted the investigation was not created to apply additional pressure on China as it relates to North Korea despite the president's previous remarks that he would be more amenable on trade if China stopped Pyongyang's nuclear program.

The White House said in a statement that Trump and Xi "agreed North Korea must stop its provocative and escalatory behavior".

The tough talk capped a week in which long-standing tensions between the countries risked abruptly boiling over.

North Korea warned foreign diplomats to leave Pyongyang in 2013 when it suspended work at a joint inter-Korean industrial park and threatened missile strikes on U.S. Pacific bases, notably in Guam and Hawaii.

As the US and North Korea traded jabs, many observers began to fear that the two countries might find themselves in a war that Secretary of Defense James Mattis previously said would be "catastrophic" and "tragic on an unbelievable scale".