Three men charged with Minnesota mosque bombing

Postado Março 14, 2018

The three suspects were arrested by Federal Bureau of Investigation agents in Illinois and also charged with possession of assault rifles, which are classified as machine guns, and an attempted bombing of the Women's Health Practice in Champaign, Illinois on November 7, according to a statement from the Illinois U.S. Attorney's Office in Springfield. In January, a second informant told authorities that the three men had carried out the mosque bombing and the failed clinic bombing, according to the complaint.

It wasn't clear from the complaint why the men may have targeted a mosque so far from IL.

"Hari was the driver, Morris was responsible for smashing the window in, and McWhorter was responsible for throwing the bomb in the window", the affidavit states.

The Dar Al-Farooq Islamic Center in Bloomington was bombed early on August 5. McWhorter described a PVC pipe bomb and said Morris broke a window and threw it in, where it failed to go off, according to the complaint.

The complaint also said nothing about a possible motivation for the clinic attack. A report released in June 2017 by the Council on American-Islamic Relations showed a 91% increase in anti-Muslim incidents in the first six months of 2017 compared to the previous year.

"This is definitely a relief that this case is finally to conclusion and those assailants-slash-suspects are apprehended and no longer a threat to our community", Hussein said in a telephone interview Tuesday.

The Dar al-Farooq mosque mainly serves Somalis in the Minneapolis area. Minnesota has the largest Somali community in the United States, according to the most recent census estimates.

Soon after the explosive device was thrown in, the mosque's executive director, Mohamed Omar, said, a member of the congregation rushed outside and saw a truck driving away from the mosque's parking lot. The FBI had offered a $30,000 reward for information leading to a conviction in the bombing.

Gov. Mark Dayton called the bombing an act of terrorism when he and other officials visited the mosque the day after the explosion. The Illinois U.S. Attorney's Office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.