Toddlers Consume More 'Added Sugar' Than The Recommended Amount For Adults

Postado Junho 13, 2018

And added sugar has been linked with obesity, asthma, dental cavities and heart disease risk factors such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure, the study authors said. However, the guidelines do not give any suggestions for children younger than 2. The earlier patient is introduces to high sugar consumption, the heavier the consequences he or she will face during the life. It is a source of added sugars and will influence the taste for a lifetime. Other research has shown that both eating too much naturally occurring sugar and processed sugar can change receptors in the brain, increasing cravings for sweet foods.

The researchers explain that foods that contain added sugars are not beneficial for the body as they do not provide the benefits that fruits and vegetables that naturally contain sugars provide.

Added sugars include brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrose, fructose, glucose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, lactose, malt syrup, maltose, molasses, raw sugar, and sucrose, according to the CDC. CDC report warns that toddlers are facing the highest level of added sugars in their diets - and it will pay off dearly during the life of the generation to come. The problem will be even bigger as they will get older, a new study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control concludes.

Added sugar consumption starts for many before their first birthday and increases with age as toddlers between the ages of 19 and 23 months are consuming on average more than 7 teaspoons of added sugar a day. That's more than the amount found in a Snickers bar.

Researchers found that many children under the age of 2 in the United States are eating more added sugar than the recommended amount for adults. While around 60 percent of babies between ages 6 months to 11 months consumed an average of 1 teaspoon of added sugars, 98 percent of children aged between 12 to 18 months were consuming an average of 5.5 teaspoons of sugar a day.

"This is the first time we have looked at added sugar consumption among children less than 2 years old", she said.

In the future, researchers will investigate the specific foods children consume their added sugar. They were all part of the 2011-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a research study. Past studies have pointed towards breakfast cereals, cakes and desserts, sugary drinks, yogurt and candy as the biggest culprits.