Hero Australian divers thank Thai boys and coach

Postado Julho 13, 2018

The 12 boys rescued from deep within a flooded cave in northern Thailand made two-finger victory signs from their hospital beds on Wednesday in a moving video from the isolation ward where they're recuperating from their 18-day ordeal.

Dr Richard Harris and his dive partner Craig Challen have issued a statement thanking people for their support and words of encouragement after the successful cave dive rescue of 12 trapped boys and their football coach.

"Make the most of your lives".

"We wish you the best for this very tough time".

"Hooyah!" Apakorn shouted before flying out, using a morale-building navy term.

"Our thanks and greatest admiration go the British lead divers, and support divers along the route in and out of the cave system from the EU, US, China and Australia, as well as the vast number of participants from military and civilian organisations in various support roles". They were then carried on stretchers through dry parts to the cave's entrance.

Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, however, said precautions will have to be implemented inside and outside the cave to ensure safety of tourists.

Harris played a pivotal role in the rescue effort, positioned on the muddy bank in the cave with the boys and their coach, assessing their fitness for the perilous journey back to the outside. Three have slight lung infections.

"The situation went beyond just being a rescue mission and became a symbol of unity among mankind", he said.

"FIFA's priority remains the health of everyone involved in the operation and we will look into finding a new opportunity to invite the boys to a Federation Internationale de Football Association event to share with them a moment of communion and celebration".

The boys' families can visit them wearing protective gowns and masks, it added.

Derek Anderson, a 32-year-old rescue specialist with the U.S. Air Force based in Okinawa, Japan, said that at times during the risky rescue, the boys had to be put into harnesses and high-lined across the rocky caverns.

The members of the "Wild Boars" team, aged 11-16, had no experience in scuba diving, and the death of an ex-Navy SEAL who had helped install oxygen tanks in preparation for the rescue underscored the dangers of the mission.

"All Thais are proud of you ..."

The Tham Luang cave complex will remain closed to the public for at least six months, said Chongklai Worapongsathorn, deputy director-general of the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation.