Perseids 2018: Where and how to watch the dazzling meteor shower

Postado Agosto 09, 2018

The comet that left the Perseid meteor stream is a piece of dirty ice about 26km in diameter called 109P/Swift-Tuttle.

According to NASA, the previous night (August 11-12) will also be spectacular.

The peak nights for this year's shower will be from August 11 to 12 and August 12 to 13, with more than 100 meteors visible per hour, according to Gary Boyle, an Ottawa-based astronomer.

The particles - which can be as small as a grain of sand - meet a fiery end after roughly a thousand years as part of the comet's dust cloud.

The best time to see those meteors is at around 11 p.m. ET until dawn the next morning.

Perhaps you might remember an awesome meteor show back in the early 1990s?

The Perseids meteor shower is one of the most popular meteor showers of the year, Bill Cooke, NASA meteor expert claims.

Unfortunately, you may have to stay up late or set your alarm for an early start if you want to spot the best of the display. These internationally recognized areas possess an exceptional quality of starry nights, making them ideal for shows like this one.

Last year's shower was especially active, delivering up to 150 meteors an hour expected at its height, and while this year the shooting stars won't be quite as regular, stargazers can still expect to see around 70 of them an hour.

Cooke says if you plan on watching the show, just relax, look up and enjoy the meteor show.

What do I need to see them?

In India, the shower will be visible from any place away form light pollution by city lights. He added that it takes at least 30 minutes for human eyes to adjust, so be patient and that you can expect to be outdoors for a few hours.

Patience is also a virtue, with shooting stars tending to appear in clusters, followed by a lull.

"The Perseids appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus, visible in the northern sky soon after sunset this time of year".