This Is the Best Time to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower

Postado Agosto 10, 2018

That's why some people call them shooting stars, but they have nothing to do with stars. The best time to view is after midnight each night. And, with NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke dubbing the Perseids "the best shower of the year", this certainly isn't one to miss. The peak will be from 9.00 pm on Sunday 12th August to 4.30 am on Monday 13th August.

Meteor showers are caused when meteoroids, who were once part of a comet or asteroid, start hitting Earth's atmosphere in streams.

"Preparations have been finalised where visitors can lay back and relax to watch the complete Perseid Meteor Shower from our desert Majlis setting, without the need or use of any special equipment or telescopes, though visitors are free to choose whether or not to bring one", said Alsuwaidi.

Such an adjustment occurs every 11 years or so, when Jupiter makes its closest approach to the Swift-Tuttle debris cloud, at a distance of about 160 million miles (257 million kilometers).

The shooting stars will appear to come from a single point, or "radiant", situated in the constellation Perseus, that climbs higher as the night progresses.

The meteor shower is made up of particles that crumbled away from the 26 kilometre (16 mile) wide comet as it zooms in and out of the inner Solar System.

The best nights to follow the fall of such meteors will be 11th, 12th and 13th of August 2018.

The ideal time for meteor-spotting is when the sky is at its darkest; between 1am and the onset of dawn twilight.

The 2018 Orionid meteor shower will be visible from October 2 to November 7 and is expected to peak on the night of Oct. 21-22.

It's nearly time for the annual Perseid Meteor Shower, and NASA expects it'll be the most dazzling meteor shower of the year. For the best viewing, make sure you get away from city lights. Let your eyes adjust to the dark for about 30 minutes to get the fullest experience.

Fortunately, none of these should be a major issue this year.

The Perseids are dust and debris from the Comet Swift-Tuttle, AccuWeather explains.

Good visibility is in the forecast for both nights.