Needles found in Gladstone family's strawberries

Postado Setembro 16, 2018

Dr Kelly's warning comes after a Queensland man was hospitalised after he bit into a strawberry and swallowed half a sewing needle.

Donnybrook supplies Coles and Woolworths stores across Australia.

People in possession of the brands in question should refrain from using them and strawberries from other companies "should be cut up" for safe measure, police said in the update, quoting Queensland's Chief Health Officer Dr. Jeannette Young.

It's not known if all the finds are from the original Queensland incident, because not all of them have been forensically examined.

Queensland Acting Chief Superintendent Terry Lawrence said on September 12 that the police were in contact with the farm operators and Woolworths representatives, and that they believed that the offender contaminated the stock intentionally.

Woolworths have said they have taken the contaminated strawberries off the shelves as the investigation continues.

She said she had reported it to police, who collected the fruit on Wednesday night.

The Queensland Strawberry Growers Association said it had reason to suspect that a disgruntled ex-employee may be behind the incident. "The contamination relates to what appears to be needles inserted in strawberries".

"They are also contacting the supplier, the police and health and safety", Gane stated.

Joshua Gane said that he and his friend Hoani van Dorp had bought a punnet of "Berry Obsession" strawberries from the Woolworths in Strathpine Centre.

The Queensland Strawberry Growers Association believes a disgruntled farm worker may be responsible but police say they are investigating all aspects of the strawberry transit process. "We're keeping a very open mind as to where this may have occurred".

Meanwhile, a NSW mother revealed her ten-year-old child discovered sabotaged fruit in a case yet unconfirmed by police.

It was the first time needles have been discovered in strawberries in NSW after four contaminated punnets were discovered in Queensland and NSW in recent days.

"If you are in doubt, just throw them out".

"We have not been notified of any cases of contaminated strawberries in South Australia; however, if people have Donnybrook strawberries at home or are unsure of the brand, they should be returned to the place of purchase, or discarded".

"I don't know, because the problem is there's so many people handling the fruit all the time, and packing, so I can not say where it happened", he told a Channel 9 reporter.

The incident follows an earlier plea from strawberry farmers for consumers to buy more strawberries as the market suffered a glut of the fresh fruit, dropping prices to A$1 (NZ$1.50) or less.

Stevenson immediately called her son's school and told them to stop her son from eating the strawberries.

Anyone with information that could assist the police investigation is asked to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.