Boeing upgrades software on crisis-hit 737 MAX after deadly crash

Postado Março 17, 2019

The hunt for the cause of an Ethiopian Airlines plane crash that killed all 157 people on board gathered pace on Saturday when investigators successfully downloaded the cockpit voice recorder and fresh details emerged of the final seconds of the flight.

This photo provided by by the French air accident investigation authority BEA on Thursday shows one of the black box flight recorders from the crashed Ethiopian Airlines jet.

Children gather in front of a memorial on Saturday, March 16, 2019, where an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed almost a week earlier near Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. "We are making all the necessary efforts to identify the cause of the accident", Ethiopian Minister of Transport Dagmawit Moges told reporters in Addis Ababa.

In the wake of the tragedy, which followed the similar deadly crash of Boeing 737 MAX in Indonesia in late October, aviation authorities and airlines around the world have either grounded their 737 MAX 8 series aircraft or closed their airspace to them.

Air Canada and United Airlines on Friday became the first major carriers in North America to warn of negative financial implications to business as a outcome of the grounding of the Boeing planes.

The Lion Air crash also came just minutes after takeoff, killing 189 people, and USA authorities say there is evidence of similarities between the accidents.

The investigations into both 737 Max crashes are underway, and expected to focus on the automated controls.

The crew can't do anything about it, and in the simulator; Aimer could not control the plane.

Flyadeal ordered 30 Boeing 737 MAX 8s last December with purchasing options for 20 more in a deal that Boeing said was worth $5.9 billion at list prices.

"Overall, we view the interruptions from the 737 MAX grounding as a temporary, one-off issue", Spracklin wrote.

Emirati carrier flydubai this week said the 737 MAX remained integral to its future strategy and that it valued its long-standing relationship with Boeing.

However, there have been reports from pilots that the system tip the aircraft's nose downwards within minutes of take-off, forcing them to step in to stop the plane from dropping.