Jacinda Ardern says suspect in Christchurch attack meant to continue attack

Postado Março 17, 2019

People gather at a memorial to pay tribute to victims of the mosque attacks outside Masjid Al Noor in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 16, 2019.

The statement added that a range of activities must be completed before names can be released publicly, "this includes next of kin notifications, which, in many cases, will have global aspects to them". Ardern said police would be posted at all mosques while they are open. Another two individuals are still in custody as the police continue to determine if they were involved in any way.

An aircraft engineer, a takeaway store owner, a student pilot; details emerging of some of the 50 people gunned down at two New Zealand mosques paint a picture of dozens of ordinary lives suddenly and savagely ended.

At a press conference in Wellington on Sunday, Ardern said she would discuss tightening gun access with her cabinet on Monday, and planned to "verify" information that some New Zealanders were stockpiling weapons.

He said he survived by playing dead, but was desperate to know what happened to his friends who were there with him.

The AP also reported that Tarrant, who has donated to a number of white nationalist groups but has no other direct affiliation with them, allegedly was given personal approval by Breivik to commit the mosque attacks in Christchurch, though this has yet to be verified.

The Prime Minister said the advice she had received from police indicated that the timing of the email and the information it contained did not provide enough time for response.

Before Friday's attack, New Zealand's deadliest shooting in modern history took place in 1990 in the small town of Aramoana, where a gunman killed 13 people following a dispute with a neighbour.

She said her office sent it to parliamentary security two minutes after getting it.

"I still don't know where he is", she said.

One person died in Christchurch hospital last night and staff are treating 42 patients, ranging from young children to adults, with gunshot wounds.

"I haven't spoken to her directly but she has reached out, [and given] an acknowledgment of what has occurred here in New Zealand". He was hoping semi-automatics were not banned, but he and his shooting friends were buying the weapons, which can cost anything from NZ$600 (US$400) upwards.

"We have had these guns available for a long time and we very rarely have a situation like this".

"Now is the time for change", Ardern argued.

A video of one of the shootings was live streamed on Facebook by a man identifying himself as Brenton Tarrant.

Dirie's family had fled war-torn Somalia in the mid-1990s as refugees and settled down in New Zealand.

Unlike the US, the right to own a firearm is not enshrined in New Zealand's constitution. "My message was sympathy and love for all Muslim communities", she said she told him.

"This act of terror was brought to our shores and rained down upon us".

"Fijian hearts are breaking for our brothers and sisters in New Zealand - a place where an atrocity of this nature is shocking nearly beyond comprehension".

When asked what he thought of the prime minister suggesting there should be a change in New Zealand's gun laws, the police commissioner said he was "happy to hear" that.